Original Edition Material

This page has extra material associated with the original edition of the book.

Download the Color Companion

The Color Companion is a PDF file containing images from the book, in color and high resolution, with brief commentary. It includes the new PHD Food Plate, and the Errata and Index. We encourage everyone who owns the book or is considering buying it to download this free PDF. Click to open in the browser, or right-click and “Save Target As” to download: Perfect Health Diet Color Companion.

Index

This is an online index to our book. Please feel free to suggest additional keywords in the comments.

Nutrients Index

 

Macronutrients
glucose 5, 10-15,17, 19, 24, 26, 28-40, 42-45, 52, 57, 76, 78-80, 84, 85,86, 89, 95, 103-106, 112, 133, 147-149, 152, 154, 161, 162, 189, 196, 209, 210, 224, 225, 236, 237, 242, 243, 246-248, 252-254, 257, 259, 264, 269
fiber vii, 4, 5, 11, 15, 17-19, 28, 31, 33, 45, 71, 81, 88, 92-99, 103, 106, 246, 248
fructose 2,5, 11, 12, 17, 21, 28, 33, 34, 76, 78, 99, 103-106, 115, 116, 122, 147-149, 150-152, 154, 158, 161, 168-169, 207, 224, 256, 259, 269
lauric acid 87, 88, 170
omega-6 2, 4, 6, 34, 46, 50-75, 77, 99, 102-105, 110-117, 142-147, 152, 158, 166, 230, 243, 256, 258, 259, 269
omega-3 2, 4, 46, 50-59, 61, 63, 65-75, 77, 99, 102, 108, 110-114, 117, 146, 147, 169, 227, 232, 243, 269, 270
protein vii, 2, 4, 8-20, 24-29, 31-33, 35, 37, 40, 42, 47, 49, 52, 56-58, 67, 71, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 83, 86, 88, 92, 93, 96-99, 102, 108-113, 123-130, 132-134, 136, 139, 140, 141, 145, 148, 151, 152, 154, 155, 162, 166, 168, 170, 175, 179, 183, 190, 194-196, 204, 218, 222, 224, 230, 241-248, 252-254, 260, 266
saturated fat (SaFA) vii, 11-12, 31, 44, 46, 50-54, 57-58, 61-62, 76-83, 87, 93, 104, 112, 170
monounsaturated fat (MUFA) vii, 4, 13-15, 17, 46, 50-58, 61-68, 70-71, 73-74, 76-77, 79, 82-83, 99, 106, 113-114, 230, 256, 269
short-chain fat vii, 4, 11,13-19, 31, 33, 50, 84-86, 88-91, 93, 96-99, 114, 169, 247, 252, 253, 261, 266

 

Micronutrients
vitamin A 95, 113, 181, 183, 203, 208, 210, 217-219, 222, 226, 231
vitamin B1 (thiamin) 180, 215-216, 219, 226
vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 215-216
vitamin B3 (niacin) 84, 90, 137, 180-181, 215, 217, 223-225, 242
vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) 215-216
vitamin B6 215
vitamin B12 215, 219, 226, 232, 270
folate or folic acid 113, 181, 215, 217, 226-227, 231-232
biotin 215-216, 254
choline 30, 46-47, 110, 112, 219, 227, 231, 256, 270
vitamin C 5, 33, 43, 91, 153, 178, 180-182, 198, 202, 211-214
vitamin D 5, 32, 124, 134-137, 180, 181-190, 194-196, 203-205, 209, 215-221, 228, 242-244, 248
vitamin E 181, 202, 214, 217, 223, 225-226
vitamin K2 110, 180-182, 190-196, 221, 228, 270
calcium 41-42, 135-136, 181, 183-184, 190, 192, 204-205, 209, 217, 219-221, 232, 241, 266
choline 30, 46, 47, 110, 112, 219, 227, 231, 256, 270
chromium 2, 182, 208-211, 222, 238
copper 2, 175, 182, 206-210, 219, 222-223, 228, 242
iodine 2, 5, 106, 179, 182, 196-203, 208, 210, 222, 228, 232, 242, 244, 259
iron 80, 87, 89, 94, 97, 98, 113, 121, 153, 181, 190, 201, 208, 210, 222, 241, 242, 244
magnesium 2, 5, 175, 180, 182, 203-206, 209, 221, 228, 232, 241
salt 2, 106, 107, 141, 153, 171, 179
selenium 2, 91, 113, 116, 182, 196-199, 201-203, 212, 214, 225, 228, 232, 254, 259
sodium 95, 106, 153
zinc 208-211, 217, 221-223, 242

 

Diseases

 

addiction/addictive 6, 124, 130, 138
alcohol/alcoholism 56, 57, 58, 71, 121, 124, 125, 148, 212, 256
allergenic/allergies/allergy ix, 2, 59, 75, 97, 140, 177
Alzheimer’s 18, 39, 42, 59, 85, 137, 141, 189, 237, 239, 245, 246
arthritis/arthritic 39, 66, 129, 154, 161, 182, 192, 237, 239, 240
autism 85, 182, 244
autoimmune disease 3, 39, 124, 128, 129, 133, 138, 186, 189, 201
cancer v, ix, 17-18, 20, 31, 35, 39-40, 44-45, 52, 61-65, 69-70, 83-84, 86-87, 91, 94, 121, 124, 128-129, 131, 138, 142, 146, 153, 170, 180, 182, 184, 186-187, 190-191, 193-194, 196, 198-200, 202, 212-215, 217, 219, 225-226, 236, 238, 242-243, 249-250, 252, 254
cardiovascular disease 35, 37, 39, 41, 67, 71, 75, 82-83, 91, 142-143, 148, 150-151, 175, 180, 182, 187, 204, 208, 212, 226
celiac disease 121, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 131, 132, 136, 140
chronic fatigue 39, 238, 239
constipation ix, 33, 94, 136, 203
dementia 3, 6, 41, 152, 170, 182, 189, 240
depression 17, 59, 69, 146, 176, 182, 203, 222, 243
diabetes ix, 6, 9-10, 17, 20, 31, 34-35, 40-42, 44-45, 89, 94-95, 129, 129, 148, 150-153, 161-162, 170, 177, 188, 204, 210, 216, 236, 249, 252-253, 257, 269
fibromyalgia 18, 182, 252
flu (influenza) 188
heart disease ix, 3, 6, 35, 33, 36-37, 40-41, 48, 52-53, 61-64, 67-68, 76, 79, 82, 88-89, 90, 124, 128, 130, 140, 143, 146, 153, 162, 170, 182, 185, 188, 192-193, 203, 209, 213, 221, 223, 269
hypothyroid 81, 127, 128, 196, 198, 199, 201, 203, 204, 205, 244, 259
leaky gut 97, 139
metabolic syndrome 17, 28, 58, 78, 148, 150, 151, 152, 161, 205, 252, 256, 259
migraines 17, 205, 216, 252
multiple sclerosis 18, 39, 59, 129, 137, 182, 189, 190, 237, 239, 252
neuropathy ix, 34, 35, 124, 128-130, 210, 240
obesity ix, 6, 9-10, 17, 26, 34, 58, 79, 82, 90, 92, 94, 133, 142, 148, 150, 151-152, 161, 170, 177-178, 182, 224, 236, 252, 255-261, 269
schizophrenia 17, 85, 86, 124, 130, 131, 138, 177, 239, 252
stroke v, ix, 6, 20, 36, 40-41, 66, 71, 83, 89-90, 153, 170, 180, 187, 220, 226, 237, 239

 

Foods

 

beans 2., 60, 121, 139, 140, 141, 269
beef 52, 54, 58, 75, 99, 102, 104,108, 110, 111, 112, 113, 121, 153, 166, 182, 209, 228, 230, 231, 232, 234, 258, 267
chicken 87, 102, 104, 108, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 171, 209, 230, 233, 264, 265
chocolate 114, 168, 209, 265
coconut oil 2, 17-18, 31, 33, 52, 54, 57-58, 75, 84, 88, 89-91, 98-99, 102-104, 108, 110, 113-114, 117, 146-147, 158, 166-167, 169-170, 223, 233, 246-248, 252-254, 258, 261, 267, 269
eggs 2, 20, 52, 61, 80, 99, 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 154, 164, 165, 169, 170, 175, 191, 219, 233, 234, 265, 266, 269, 270
fish oil 57, 63, 65, 71, 72, 91, 94, 143, 144, 217, 227
flaxseed 54, 269, 270
fruit 2, 12, 13, 14, 45, 73, 96, 98, 99 ,102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 115, 117, 147, 149, 152, 153, 155, 158, 168, 169, 170, 171, 174, 175, 259, 265, 269
grain vii, viii, 2, 6, 52, 56, 73, 78, 92, 93, 98, 110, 112, 113, 122, 123, 124, 125, 130, 131, 132, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 142, 145, 153, 154, 156, 157, 158, 160, 161, 162, 164, 165, 169, 170, 175, 201, 202, 204, 224, 259, 265, 266, 269
legumes vii, 2, 73, 116, 122, 132, 134, 138-142, 145, 153, 157-158, 160-162, 169, 175, 203
liver (the food) 108, 111, 116, 135, 174, 177, 182, 191, 193, 208, 209, 217, 219, 226, 228, 231, 233, 260, 266 (CLO; 63)
nuts 2, 97, 115, 116, 182, 202, 208, 298, 228, 234, 269
rice 2, 17, 20, 33, 43, 45, 95, 99, 103, 104, 106, 107, 115, 123, 124, 130, 132, 151, 154, 155, 164, 165, 168, 169, 174, 230, 231, 233, 234, 269
safe starch 17, 18, 33, 96, 99, 103, 104, 107, 117, 130, 154, 155, 165, 168, 169, 170, 234, 253, 269
salmon 2, 52, 53, 54, 71, 74, 75, 87, 99, 102, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 117, 153, 227, 258
fish 2, 8, 52, 53, 54, 57, 63, 65, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 91, 93, 94, 99, 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 116, 143, 144, 169, 170, 171, 208, 217, 219, 227, 258, 269
seaweed / kelp 2, 106, 117, 169, 171, 182, 200, 201, 202, 226, 228, 230, 231, 232, 234, 248
soy 2, 6, 20, 21, 54, 56, 57, 60, 61, 63, 84, 90, 91, 102, 104, 112, 114, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 166, 197, 232, 258
sugar 2, 6, 20, 27-29, 25, 55-58, 71, 114, 122, 144, 147, 150-153, 158, 168-169, 174, 207, 230, 243, 244, 257, 259
wheat 2, 6, 21, 34, 56, 58, 94, 104, 114, 121, 123-137, 140, 142, 155, 165, 174, 201, 243, 256, 259
vegetable oil 58-59, 69, 74-75, 142, 146, 165, 256

 

Biomarkers

 

25OHD 182-188, 190, 220-221, 242-244
blood pressure 78, 106, 148, 149, 150, 151, 161, 170, 182,194, 205, 206, 248, 249
cholesterol 6, 47, 48, 53, 57, 62, 63, 71, 79, 88, 89, 90, 95, 142, 149, 170, 182, 222, 256
HDL 37-38, 47, 79, 84, 88, 90, 223
LDL 37-38, 47-48, 67, 76-77, 79, 88-90, 149
triglyceride 30-31, 37-38, 46-47, 77-79, 83-84, 86, 90, 95, 143, 149
TSH 202-203, 260

 

Blogger Index

 

Stephan Guyenet 58-60, 64, 67, 69, 70, 75, 77, 90, 93, 94, 125-127, 129, 136, 140, 143, 161, 162, 193, 207
Peter Dobromylskyj 10, 97, 138
Chris Masterjohn 57, 185, 218

 

Other Keywords

 

AGEs 148, 153
autophagy 27, 242, 245, 246, 247, 260
fungi/fungal/fungicidal ix, 5, 30, 32, 33, 41, 84, 87, 121, 197, 210, 223, 236, 238, 241, 242, 243, 244, 254
glutathione 23, 67, 85, 116, 197, 205, 211-212, 242, 254
gluten 86, 91, 121, 124-132, 136, 138, 141, 165
H. pylori 87, 134, 237, 238
intermittent fasting 2, 260, 264
IQ 178, 179
ketogenic 2, 5, 16, 17, 18, 31, 32, 40, 43, 45, 84, 85, 86, 87, 89, 91, 99, 131, 236, 246, 247, 252, 253
liver (the organ) 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 43, 44, 45, 56, 57, 58, 71, 76, 78, 79, 84, 87, 88, 90, 99, 140, 143, 144, 146, 147, 148, 150, 151, 152, 182, 191, 193, 194, 199, 208, 223, 246, 247, 252, 256, 257, 260
macronutrient vii, 4, 5, 8, 10-15, 17, 20, 21, 48, 56, 57, 82, 99, 102, 106, 108-111, 117, 151, 161, 162, 174, 179, 252, 259, 269
multivitamin viii, 2, 5, 180-182, 204, 206, 208, 214-217, 219, 221, 223, 225, 226, 228, 266
muscle 9, 11, 13, 24, 25, 27, 29, 30, 31, 33, 42, 43, 51, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 108, 109, 130, 154, 160, 174, 203, 205, 207, 211, 212, 213, 231, 243, 245, 249, 253, 260, 261
nightshade 153, 154
opioid 6, 124, 130, 131, 132, 155
paleolithic / paleo vii, viii, ix, x, 5, 8, 72, 73, 80, 89, 98, 99, 106, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 165, 174, 175, 176, 233
Weston A. Price Foundation 80, 145, 154, 169, 185

 

Errata

These are corrections or clarifications to the text of the book. Deletions or additions are in italic bold.

Page
The Book Reads …
… But Should Read
p 12
  • Most carbs are a fat source. The average American gets 55% of calories from carbs, but most of these are converted to fat. On high-carb diets, fructose is converted directly to fat in the liver (if all goes well), and beyond 15-20% of calories glucose is either converted to fat and stored in fat cells, or substitutes for fat as an energy source. Thus, that 55% of calories that enters the mouth as carbs may later end up in the body mostly as the 16-chain saturated fat palmitic acid.

Most people don’t know that most of the carbs they eat become fat in the body. If they did, they might not be so shy about eating the fat directly.

  • Excess carbs are a fat source. The average American gets 55% of calories from carbs, but will probably not utilize more than about 30% of energy as glucose. On high-carb diets, fructose is converted directly to fat in the liver (if all goes well), and excess glucose is either converted to fat or substitutes for fat as an energy source. Thus, a significant fraction of that 55% of calories that enters the mouth as carbs may end up in the body as fat.

Most people don’t know that many of the carbs they eat become fat in the body. If they did, they might not be so shy about eating the fat directly.

p 45 the impaired immune function and other risks of glycogen deprivation.
the impaired immune function and other risks of glucose deprivation.
p 76 the chemically fragile PUFA, whose extra carbon double bonds are easily altered by oxidation, glycation, or fructation, are frequently modified into toxic compounds in the body.
the chemically fragile PUFA, whose extra carbon double bonds are easily altered by oxidation, are frequently modified into toxic compounds in the body.
p 96 Although gut bacteria generate healthful short-chain fats, they also generate harmful “endotoxins” – toxic bacterial proteins that excite an immune response….
Endotoxins are fat-soluble proteins and they are carried into the body with dietary fats.
Although gut bacteria generate healthful short-chain fats, they also generate “endotoxins” – lipopolysaccharides that excite an immune response….
Endotoxins are fat-soluble and are carried into the body with dietary fats.
p 104 Rice has about 1300 calories per pound: thus, a quarter pound (100 g), or about 3/4 cup (180 ml) of cooked rice, will provide the daily 300-400 calories.
Uncooked rice has about 1300 to 1700 calories per pound, but rice absorbs a lot of water during cooking and cooked rice typically has only 500 to 600 calories per pound. Thus, a cup (180 ml/160 g) of cooked rice will provide about 200 carb calories, and several cups of cooked rice may be eaten per day.
p 126 fn 208 Stephan Guyenet, faulty link
Stephan Guyenet, correct link
p 170 Hormone-dependent cancers, like breast, cancer, ovarian, and colon cancer
Hormone-dependent cancers, like breast, ovarian, and colon cancer
p 191 Most people get some MK-7 from gut bacteria and some MK-4 from foods like liver, butter, cream, cheese, and eggs.
Most people get some MK-7 from gut bacterial fermentation of fiber and fermented foods like cheese, kimchi, and natto, and MK-4 from animal foods such as liver, butter, cream, and eggs.
p 207 recommended daily allowance is only 0.9 gm/day.
recommended daily allowance is only 0.9 mg/day.
p 211 Blood tests found that 34% of men and 27% of men
Blood tests found that 34% of men and 27% of women
p 213 he was cured by 100 mg/day vitamin C
he was cured by 100 g/day vitamin C
p 243 Bacterial infections of the brain often cause depression, and drugs which relieve the depression by increasing serotonin levels may backfire by providing bacteria with tryptophan.
For this reason, bacterial infections of the brain often cause depression.
p 252 Cancer cells are metabolically impaired and can only metabolize glucose, a phenomenon known as the Warburg Effect.
Cancer cells are metabolically impaired and can only metabolize glucose and some amino acids such as glutamine.
p 259 fructose avoidance is needed to prevent toxic “fructation” of omega-6.
fructose avoidance is needed to prevent toxic “fructation” of proteins and subsequent peroxidation of omega-6.
p 266 Breunig
Breuning

Leave a comment ?

109 Comments.

  1. Hi Frank,

    Krill oil is excellent, but I wouldn’t count on astaxanthin to keep it from oxidizing. That might lengthen the shelf life but it doesn’t make it immune to oxidation.

  2. Paul,

    Thanks for the reply. Yes, I wouldn’t expect the krill oil (in gelcap form) to be immune to oxidation, but it sounds like it’s fine as long as I use it within a reasonable amount of time (and provided it’s not old when I buy it!). I’m also considering getting a dark glass bottle to transfer it to whenever I buy a new bottle, as I’ve read that plastic bottles will allow some oxygen to get in.

    I would rather get all my omega-3 from fish, but wild fish is quite a bit more expensive (at least in my area), so that’s why I supplement with krill oil. The local Whole Foods does have canned wild salmon and tuna, so that’s another reasonable priced option that I’ve been using.

  3. Stephen Anderson

    I have purchased your excellent book for my Kindle Fire. Looks very good and the content is outstanding.

    You might consider editing the Kindle version to correct the errata since it is so easy to modify and republish Kindle books.

    Stephen

  4. Hi Paul,
    Great book – finally answers many questions that I could never resolve. Question – Cod Liver Oil for Vitamin D – Any Good ? And if so roughly how much. Since starting to take it one year ago Its worked wonders.

    Thanks Paul – I am sure that you have added a good 5 – 8 years of life to my alloted time – the rest is, I feel, up to me.

    PS have bought 2 copies, one for me and one for my partner.

  5. Hi Josh,

    I would consider cod liver primarily a source of omega-3 and vitamin A, rather than D. I would limit it to a teaspoon a day.

  6. Hi Paul,

    Just getting started with PHD. I did have a question about grapeseed oil. As it tolerates high temperatures, I like to cook with it sometimes when I want to avoid a coconut taste from coconut oil. Is that OK?

    Thanks, Terry

  7. Hi Terry,

    Grapeseed oil is 70% omega-6 (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fats-and-oils/579/2), so we don’t recommend it. Clarified butter or rendered beef fat would be our top choices along with coconut oil; palm oil or macadamia nut oil are possible vegetable oils. Some people like refined coconut oil which lacks the coconut taste.

  8. Thanks for your quick reply. I haven’t worried about omega-6 content before, so now I know what to look for when considering what oil to use.

  9. Hi Paul,

    i have been following your blog for a few months and its in the top 5 for me. Absolutely love it.

    I was going to buy the book, but i read that with all the errata corrections, and also some modifications you have blogged about (such as the Weight Loss / reduced fat , and Muscle Gain / higher protein versions) subsequent to the 1st Edition, you are going to do a 2nd Edition hopefully next year.

    I have a feeling there are more modifications and ideas yet to come (such as higher fructose intake benefit theories). Are you still on track for a 2nd Edition in 2013?

    Of course, i realise the goalposts are dynamic and always changing, so its a nightmare to try and provide a book that is all-encompassing with the latest knowledge.

  10. Hi Rob,

    We’ll come out with a cookbook first. Then consider a revision. So 2013 would be the earliest.

    The biggest change will not be to the content or advice, but to the presentation. I’ve been giving a lot of talks and that helps clarify what’s important, and how to get the ideas across most clearly.

    I’ll do a blog post about fructose in coming months.

    Best, Paul

    • Hi Paul, When are you coming out with a cookbook. I’m dying to buy one when you do. Some ideas for breakfasts in it would be good too. I love the perfect health diet, its great. I had been ready vast amounts of books on healthy diets and when I came across your book, it summed up everything I had learnt. Well done!

  11. Hi,

    Your B vitamin section really ought to mention the different types of B12: cyano-B12 (the synthetic one) and 3 natural B12′s methy, hydroxo and adenosyl.

    B12 deficiency is traditionally associated with paranoia.

    VitE… most research has been done with dl-alpha tocopherol. The natural form is d and it is common for one isomer to have undesirable side effects eg. thalidomide. There are 8 natural tocopherols and tocotrienols (4 of each). The least studied are the tocotrienols… which are the most active… and thus probably the most healthful.

    A few more diagrams explaining what terms were would have been useful. Everyone uses terms like ketones without ever showing their structure. Terms like denature are likewise rarely defined but often discussed.

    Not enough authors collect errata. It’s a good habit…and it helps makes good books better.

    Your book had lots of interesting stuff in it.

    :-)

  12. Hi Michael,

    Thanks! All good suggestions for the next edition.

  13. Your mention of EFA’s was somewhat superficial: Alpha Linolenic Acid ALA (ALA – Omega3) and Linoleic Acid (LA- Omega6) are EFA’s. This means the body can not make them. They must be ingested.

    Lumping all omega 6 fats (non-EFA’s) into the same category as LA (an EFA) is misleading.

    The behaviour of cold pressed fats can not be compared to heat and solvent extracted (processed) fats:

    Processed LA will cause heart disease yet cold pressed LA will reverse it.

    Cooking with any mono or polyunsaturated fat will oxidise it… and oxidised fat is the basis of arterial plaque in heart disease.

    The same mistakes were made when comparing caged eggs v’s free range.

    Also free range beef v’s corn fed beef.

    Totally different lipid profiles.

    The more natural product is more healthful.

    :-(

  14. Hello,

    While much of this makes a lot of sense, I am trying to figure out how to reconcile the environmental costs of meat production and consumption (I cannot afford to feed my whole family only organic meats and dairy products) with your recommendations. Also, I can’t help but still worry about the implications on heart disease, stroke risk, and the like, on such a high saturated fat diet….

    Thanks for your feedback and for the conversation.

  15. Hi Geraldine,

    Re the issue of cost, we don’t require eating only organic foods. We didn’t for our first few years on this way of eating. We now spend considerably less on food than we used to, mainly because we rarely eat out. Healthy food is not necessarily expensive. Eggs, milk, bones, organ meats, rice, potatoes are all inexpensive, just off the top of my head.

    As for the issue of saturated fat and disease risk, you might wish to read our book. Our diet is designed to minimize disease risk.

    Best, Paul

  16. In Australia most beef is grass fed whereas in the US beef is mainly grain fed. Bernando LaPallo who is 110 years lives in the US and gets around this problem by eating fish. He says the US meats are not healthy.

    The price of free range v’s caged eggs is roughly double… but it makes very little difference to your overall budget.

    Free range is a good idea… as the meats/eggs are not only healthier they are also noticeably tastier. Most people base their buying on taste… so once people work this out they usually don’t mind paying a bit extra.

    Most people spend more on junk food and consumer gadgets than they do on food. The number one food item sold in supermarkets is coke. The cost of a bottle of coke is roughly the cost of upgrading to a free range chicken or free range eggs.

    If you start eating healthier you’ll find you spend less on food not more: Only a few healthy foods cost more. Most healthy foods cost less.

    No matter how a budget is sliced if you remove the junk foods there is LOTS of money left over for healthier foods… and at the end of the day you’re still spending less. In the long term you also visit the doctor less… and that’s a major saving. Every budget shows this same pattern.

  17. Someone may already have pointed this out, but on page 207′ re RDA for copper the book reads .9 gm. I believe it should be .9 mg.

  18. Hi I bought your book on kindle — about 1/3 the way through. I am going to your lecture at the nyc crossfit. — I am having trouble comprehending all the data so far is there a perfect health diet for dummies? —

    do you provide a model (meal plan) i can work of?
    example what is a good breakfast
    lunch
    dinner
    snacks and times best to eat?

    Please advise if you can.
    thanks very much.

    Ian

    Hi Ian,

    That’s a project for this year. In the meantime, try looking at the PHD Food Plate (on the “the diet” page), and at our Food posts. Some of them have meal / plate photos.

    Best, Paul

  19. when you write “Fats should supply most (50-70%) daily calories”
    how can i prepare a meal and knowing i am getting this ratio?
    any tips?

    Hi Ian,

    Meats should be fatty enough to be moist rather than dry to the taste. Ribs are 80%, bacon 90% fat, eggs 68% fat, ribeye steak 60% fat if you don’t trim the fat off, but chicken breast may be only 30% fat. So, a typical steak or egg or oily fish like salmon would be in a good range.

    Then, cook vegetables in a bit of oil and combine starches with a bit of fat. For instance, butter on potatoes. You don’t need to overdo it because fat is much more calorie dense than plant foods. Or, eat some fatty plant foods like avocado or nuts.

    Best, Paul

  20. Thought you might find this interview on coconut reversing alzheimers interesting:

    http://dotsub.com/view/4e26ccaf-e0d2-42cf-8136-48429a1b3386

    Coconut forms ketones which the brain (and other cells) can use instead of glucose.

    Another fact that most people don’t realise is that the brain is mainly made from saturated fat!!!

    :-)

    Hi Michael,

    Mary Newport’s story is cited in our book.

    Best, Paul

  21. Thanks Paul – i promise to read the rest of the book before i start asking questions… (but if i could do one more)

    What in your opinion is a staple breakfast using the perfect health diet plan.

    3 scrambled eggs + real butter with spinach, green peppers mushrooms and half cup white rice. (can i ad any cheese)

    how would you modify that?

    Hi Ian,

    That’s good. For me a typical breakfast would be 3 eggs fried in butter, plantains or potatoes with butter, and tomatoes. Spinach is a good addition. When I’m less hungry, some yogurt and a banana, maybe a boiled egg or two. Usually I do intermittent fasting till noon, then a light breakfast, then a bigger lunch at 3 pm or so. Sometimes breakfast and lunch merge, then I’ll usually eat bi bim bap or a bone broth soup with rice, eggs/egg yolks, meat, vegetables.

    Yes, cheese is fine.

  22. Finnish ed the book! I started taking notes and was able to grasp your concepts better.
    Its seems PHD and the Paleo Diet conflict on several areas which keeps the common folk like me thinking hmm. which one is right? (lean or fatty meats baffled me)
    I have a few quires was hoping you would address.

    Do you weigh the meat before or after you cook it?
    Do you recommend a specific kind of weigh protein power?
    How should i prepare the vegetables?
    Should i eat a 3/4up of rice and 3/4 cup of sweet potato a day or just 3/4 cup of starch per day?
    Can i drink coconut oil directly?

    Thanks again?

    Ian

    Hi Ian,

    Sites like http://nutritiondata.com usually give the nutrient breakdown for both cooked and uncooked food. So if you weigh the cooked food, look up the cooked item; if you weigh the uncooked food, look up the uncooked item.

    We don’t positively recommend protein powders, we don’t discourage whey supplements either. We don’t have a brand preference.

    Vegetables — lightly cooked in a bone broth soup is my favorite. But any standard method involving gentle cooking is good.

    Starches — only 3/4 cup is too little. 2 cups would be better. 1 cup of cooked white rice has 212 carb calories (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5718/2), and that is one of the more calorically dense safe starches.

    Coconut oil – yes, but why? A tablespoon or two a day is enough unless you are on a ketogenic diet for therapeutic purposes. You can get that by using coconut milk in your cooking.

    Best, Paul

    • Hi Ian and Paul,
      The same question for starches. Hw many cups of cooked potatoes or starches to have one pound of carbs in our “PHD plate ?” Thanks ! :???: Best ,Maya

  23. Deann Hartman

    Hi Paul,
    I was surprised there was no mention of magnesium as a supplement for dealing with constipation in the blog entry of 4-4-11. I take it regularly and think it’s a big help since I no longer take supplemental fiber.

    Thanks,
    Deann

    Hi Deann,

    Magnesium is mentioned, in the hypothyroidism and laxative sections (see http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?cat=121). Also, in general our posts presume that our standard recommendation to supplement certain nutrients – magnesium notably among them – hold unless otherwise mentioned. I agree, magnesium supplementation is the first thing to try.

    Best, Paul

  24. Hi Paul

    Someone had asked this question

    “rhc

    Do you have any advice in the book or on this site for those of us whose blood sugar goes to 200 with just 1/2 cup of rice or potatoes or yams?”

    I had the same question in mind for you.I know in the book (or site?)if I remember right you recommend a min 200 cal carb (50g). In one of your posts you mention that even diabetics can manage 400 cal (100 g) per day without much risk of hyperglycemic toxicity. Today since you recommend a higher carb percentage do you have a different or new advice.

    Thanks ,Nada

    Hi Nada,

    My first question in such a case would be: does the person have diabetes? (Ie a high fasting blood glucose). If so, then diet and seeing a doctor about how to manage it.

    If it’s not diabetes then I would take such a glycemic response as a strong indication of a small bowel and/or pancreatic infection. My main advice in such a case would be to go to a doctor and get tested for bowel infections. It’s quite unlikely blood glucose regulation would be that impaired without an infection. A stool test and other tests could help identify the pathogen and indicate a treatment.

    There are other things that can be done to improve glycemic response. Micronutrient deficiencies, eg chromium, can cause problems in glucose regulation. Also foods can be combined to minimize the glycemic response to rice, see http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=4937.

    Best, Paul

  25. Josh Poznanski

    Dear Paul,

    In the years I have been reading about type 2 diabetes, somewhere along the line I read that sugar receptors and Vitamin C receptors are the same and that therefore type 2 diabetics are dramatically low in Vitamin c. Now, is it possible that we can cheat the body by taking 1gm, or more, of vitamin-c half an hour before a meal and fill the vitaminc/sugar receptors before a meal is injestion with its carbs as sugars or starches?

    If the can possibly work then we may be able to kill two birds with one stone, so to say, by guaranteeing a good suplly of Vitamin-c to the body and reducing the sugar overload which causes Insulin spikes. Of course to get maximum benefits chromium would have to be added to the diet to open the insulin resistant cells even further. The only side affect of overdosing on Vitamin-c would be Diarrhea. Personally I use the EsterC variety.

    I would greatly appreciate your comments and guidance – if you have any ideas on this line of thought.

    With best regards
    Josh Poznanski

  26. Hi Josh,

    You probably read it in our book, or in our Scurvy post. It’s more of a problem in Type 1 diabetics than Type 2.

    It’s an interesting idea. However, you’ll reach bowel tolerance before serum levels of vitamin C are high enough to effectively compete with glucose.

    The bigger issue, however, is the issue of insulin resistance, which is generally severe in Type 2 diabetes. That means few receptors for either the glucose or insulin. Occupying the receptors with vitamin C would be like reducing the number further, making you effectively more insulin resistant. That might be a bad thing.

    Best, Paul

    • Dear Paul,

      I refer back to my April 12, 2012 Post regarding Vitamin C and “Type 2 Diabetes” – and your reply of same date.

      To bring you up to date – for over 12 months I have been injesting 10 plus GRAMS of Sodium Ascorbate, the non acidic type used in hospital for injectin directly into the blood stream, IF THEY AGREE TO GIVE A PATIENT A VITAMIC C drip. This together with the Amino Acid Lysene (6 Grams Daily) for just over a year )-it acts in combination with Sodium Ascorbate, over a 2 years period, like a detergent to sweep the arteries clean of Cholestrol buildup.

      Results – just for type 2 diabetes – Brain fog after meals – no more – short term memory – returned 4 months ago – high plood pressure under perfect control – blood sugar spiles – very rarely – overall – I would say that my Type 2 Diabetes has regressed by 65% – example – this morning at 11.30 am I had two large bananas for breakfast – blood sugar reading at 12.30 pm 12.3 further test at 1.30 pm 7.2 – thats a drop of 5 points, or 40.65% 1 HOUR LATER – so as far as I am concerned my Diabetes is very much under control – and regressing daily.

      Megadosing on Vitamin C (As Sodium Ascorbate POWDER), in combination with a healthy DIET – which you advocate and guide toward)is ESSENTIAL for good health and LONGAVITY.

      Suggest people read the Book “700 Vitamin C Secrets: (and 1,000 Not So Secret for Doctors!) – by Professor Sydney J Bush – Google it and follow links – Amazon has it permanently UNAVAILABLE despite stocks being available – which is additionional information to your information – if you have not read it yourself suggest you do so – if you cannot find the Book please contact me and I will arrange with Professor Bush to send it to you directly – Price is UKPounds 35.00 DELIVERED -I am sure you will find it of great use in your search for better health –

      Side effects of Megadosing on Vitamin C

      1. Hair Regrowth at age 67
      2. Firmer, longer lastin erections
      3. Run out of energy at 10 pm rather then 1 pm
      4. Colour of eye Pupils returning to same as in youth, Dark Brown rather then the blue/green colour of 1 year ago
      5. Skin thickened up
      6. Terribel smell in Urin for 10 months as body detoxified
      7. Less bleeding of gums when brushed
      8. Stronger nails – no longer break
      9. practically no white spots on new fingernail growth
      10. No raised heartbeat after a brisk paced 5 km walk (5kms in 40 minutes)

      And so the list goes on.

      Hope you find this information useful, and Professor Bush allows his information to be used in other books – so if you think that any of the information is useful I am sure you would be able to incorperate any you think helful in future editions of you book.

      And no – I am not seeling anything – I just want to share this information.

      With best regards

      Josh Poznanski

      • Hi Josh,

        Glad to hear the good news. Like you I believe in vitamin C. I am not convinced it is necessary to take sodium ascorbate – you can get an excess of sodium. But, those are tremendous results. Happy New Year!

        Paul

        • Hi Paul,
          Thank you for the reply and the good wishes – 30 years of injesting 30 grams of Sodium Ascorbate have shown no access uptake of Sodium in Stdney Bush – and he is now in his mid 80′s.

          It was midnight when I wrote to you so I missed one major point – In you 2012 reply you indicated that an uptake of vitamin C, by its receptors, would likely reduce the number of Insulin receptors thus making the INSULIN RESISTANCE even worse. My own experiance is as follows, and was varified by Professor Bush on being questioned:-

          1. Sodium Ascorbate (Vitamin C) actually REDUCED the blood sugar levels when injested
          2. My Partener, who is Chinese and suffers the occasional Hypoglycimic attack (a sign of pre-diabetes) had to REDUCE the amount of daily Sodium Ascorbate as, due to her body mass and weight, she was getting nearly daily Hypoglycimic attacks. We cut the dosge by 40% and not one attach since.
          3. There is a great deal of litrature on the Insulin Mimicking effect of Vitamin C
          4. I personally feel that Vitamin C is the bedrock of health – but without a HEALTHY DIET, there can be no good health or life extension.

          Professor Bush states that we all suffere from Sub Clinical Scurvy, which you mention, at some time in our life, and with the modern food processing, most of us suffer it during most of our life – until it kills us in one of a number of ways.

          Please don’t overlook this – it may become a majot arrow in your FIGHT for better community, and personal, health.

          Have a happy New Year Paul.

        • josh,

          very interesting points about vitamin C… how can I obtain this book?

          thanks

        • I rather take sodium ascorbate than Ascorbic acid , it acidifiers the system and might encourage cancer.

  27. You need to get someone to install a proper search engine and index for this site. I find both almost useless, or at best very difficult to use.

    That said I loved your book. By far the best book about diet I have ever read. I appreciated its concise explanations.

  28. @Clyde: just use google and type in

    “YourSearchTerm site:perfecthealthdiet.com”

    where obviously “YourSearchTerm” is what you are looking for – there is no better search engine, I guarantee. And it makes spam like the one by “webhosting” (I assume Paul will remove it in a second) look even more ridiculous

  29. Suggested keyword for the book’s index: “Ankylosing spondylitis”, or possibly just “spondylitis”, on Pp 137, 138.

  30. In the Color Companion PDF, it says:

    If you find errors in the book, please let us know by leaving a comment on the Errata+Index page.

    with “Errata+Index” colored as though providing a link. But clicking on it does not work.

    Also, on your homepage, the Errata+Index link is hidden under Buy Our Book.

  31. The correction for p104 includes, “Thus, a cup (180 ml/160 g) of cooked rice will provide about 200 carb calories…”, but a cup is 240 ml.

  32. P195 in the book says, “Although K2 deficiency leads to hemorrhaging, high doses of K2 do not necessarily lead to clotting, as long as K2 dose is adjusted gradually. Because vitamin K2 activates…, high levels of vitamin K2 are generally consistent with normal blood clotting,”

    I think you must mean “vitamin K1″ throughout. I managed to access the reference, but it speaks simply of “vitamin K”, and I don’t have the technical background to decode it and tell which they mean. But my understanding is that it is K1 that mainly has to do with clotting/etc. And it is K1 that is injected into babies, which seems to be the subject of the reference.

  33. The correction for p191 says,

    Most people get some MK-7 from gut bacterial fermentation of fiber and fermented foods like cheese, kimchi, and natto…

    I think it reads a bit more easily with an added “from”:

    Most people get some MK-7 from gut bacterial fermentation of fiber and from fermented foods like cheese, kimchi, and natto…

  34. On your homepage, Site Guide, which one would expect to explain how to get around on the site, goes to a page apparently intended for blogging on a specific subject matter subdivision.

  35. The index you have provided is a *big* advance over no index at all, but I think its design is defective. In a conventional index, all that is necessary is to locate a target term in an alphabetical list, a task most of us can accomplish without actually thinking at all. But the provided index requires the user first to assign the term to a category (after becoming familiar with the set of categories you’ve chosen) and then to locate it in an UNalphabetized list. The lists are short, so this is feasible, but it takes getting used to, and it’s all more work than it needs to be.

    Your existing book exhibits a number of unusual features of structure and format. I see almost all of them as fresh, creative, and insightful; I hope they survive into your new version. But I hope the index is conventional.

  36. I see upon actually using the index that most of the lists are alphabetized. Apologies. Separately, I also see that my references to “homepage” should have been to the menu bar, which appears on lots of pages.

  37. Moved from Paleolithic to your diet a couple of months ago. Can you answer just one question for me? Why do I keep getting this weird taste in my mouth? Is that ketosis?
    I see a brilliant herbalist who tests every supplement I take, and I took in a number of yours and my body wanted almost all of them. That was a first in my experience in seeing that person.
    I am interested in being included in a testimonial for you if this continues to work so well.
    I am a registered pharmacist, with a strong interest in nutrition.
    I am treating Asperger’s syndrome (just diagnosed), chronic anxiety, insomnia, aches, pains, tendency to injury, cyclothymia, and Lyme’s disease. If your diet continues to satisfy my cravings for food and I continue to get better, I would love to spread the word.
    Now, about that bad taste in my mouth?
    Mary Hill, Portland, OR

    • Hi Mary,

      If it’s ketosis then you should be eating more carbs and less fat. In addition to the acetones generated in ketosis, ketosis can promote growth of certain oral pathogens like Candida.

      It could be a number of other things. Some mineral overdoses can do that. I doubt you’d have an overdose in only two months, though.

      Is your mouth dry? That would indicate too few carbs.

      I don’t know what it is, but I think you should experiment a little to see what it depends on. I’d start by eating more carbs and see if that eliminates the taste.

      Thanks for offering the testimonial! We love to get those on our reader results page.

      Best, Paul

  38. Hi Paul — In my comment above that starts out:

    P195 in the book says, “Although K2 deficiency leads to hemorrhaging…

    is my guess wrong about a K1 and K2 confusion? Ie, is the book correct as it stands?

    John

    • I think the book is correct. K1 has a strong pro-clotting effect than K2. I don’t think large doses of K1 are all that dangerous, but I prefer to recommend K2 specifically, rather than K generally.

  39. hi- wondering to which edition the index/errata corresponds…I have scribner hardcover december 2012 (from UK) and for whatever reason there doesn’t appear to be any correlation between page numbers in book and page numbers for index/corrections…?? otherwise, grateful to be embarking on path I hope will finally resolve health issues – and not to have to defend the path to my skeptical scientist partner! danke danke!

  40. thanks for clarifying this!
    my real question though is about what you recommend re flaxseed/oil as source for omega 3’s. I have ocular rosacea, and with little guidance from French opthomologist, have been reading .. and reading – including references to research suggesting that flaxseed oil in diet improves the tear quality in the eye. In the earlier index to PHD, I noticed references to flaxseed – but haven’t found these (yet) in scribner edition, and flaxseed is not mentioned in the index. Anyway, wondering what you would advise.

    • Hi Lillian,

      Flaxseed is a good source of omega-3s but it should be complemented by marine fish and if you’re eating the marine fish it’s not clear you need the flaxseed. In other words, we need the marine fish for optimal health but once we have them it’s not clear we need the flaxseed. But I don’t object to eating some.

  41. I have the new edition of the book and am looking for the references/notes from each chapter. When I click on “Notes to the Book” under “resources” on the main page — I get a blank page as a result. Same thing when I click on “Buy the book”. DO you know what’s wrong? many thanks! Kaye

  42. The book is excelent. I would just like to have more examples of daily meals.

  43. We use Zimbra Collaboration Suite, an app we purchased for around two dollars. Their assertions about copying go beyond the hardware and they’re also complaining about icons for apps and even packaging. It is your responsibility to contact the seller and setup an exchange.

  44. Hey great post, I truly enjoyed reading it!

Leave a Comment


NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks: