Happy Thanksgiving!

We have much to be thankful for this year, not least the many Internet friends we’ve made through this blog. We wish you and yours have a joyful and gracious holiday!

The blog is going to take a break, since we have relatives from Asia visiting through next Tuesday.

And now … Pass the turkey please!

Leave a comment ?

14 Comments.

  1. Happy thanksgiven to you and yours too, Paul!

  2. Happy Thanksgiving Paul! Thanks so much for your informative blog and the terrific book.

  3. Enjoy. You guys deserve a rest.

  4. Happy thanksgiving!
    And thank you for the excellent blog and book.

  5. Have a happy Thanksgiving.

    And thanks for all the fascinating blog posts and your book, which I am reading.

    A couple of things you might find interesting (or not!)

    I’ve been moderate carb for 14 years and added to this paleo for 18 months. I did a dietary analysis (I very much eat listening to my body, rather than measure). It worked out at 20% carbs, 15% protein and 65% fat. I suffered reactive hypoglycemia when I ate high carb 15 years ago – never now of course.

    My father also eats like me – he’s a psychiatrist, now almost 80, still works. He gets all his blood marker tests done regularly, as he had a heart bypass 25 years ago.
    His fasting insulin is so low his doctor was worried he might have diabetes! Despite normal blood glucose and no symptoms of syndrome X, CRP less than 1, being strong and fit etc. It seems a low fasting insulin is unusual in elderly people. I see my father as an example of what a long term lower carb, healthy diet, plus exercise, can achieve. Especially given his bypass in his mid 50’s and his family history of CVD (abysmal)

  6. Happy Thanksgiving! Enjoying the blog, and book very much. Thank you.

  7. Happy Thanksgiving, Paul!

    My very Best Wishes to you and Shou-Ching this fine Holiday.

    Enjoy your break – you have earned it!

    KKC

  8. Enjoy your well-deserved rest, Paul – and thanks again for all your help and hard-work.

  9. Happy Thanksgiving. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and for your good thoughts.

  10. Hi Paul,

    I’ve recently come down with a nasty case of mononucleosis and was prescribed steroids and vicodin. Do you think there’s anything I can do besides waiting it out?

    Robert

  11. Hi Robert,

    Yes.

    First, high doses of vitamin C are helpful against viral infections. See here: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=636 for a post on Dr. Robert Cathcart’s findings.

    Second, autophagy is helpful. Intermittent fasting induces autophagy, as does protein restriction and ketones (which you can produce via coconut oil).

    Third, vitamin D is important for intracellular immunity. Get sunshine and take extra vitamin D3 during this period.

    Those are the most important steps, the usual advice like rest and fluids are also important. You might want to look at this post: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=134 for a few other ideas.

    Best, Paul

  12. Paul,

    what do you think about the idea that you can make certain pathogens migrate from a controllable environment (gut) to a uncontrollable environment (brain ?) due to glucose restriction.

    The theory is that everyone has pathogens and that is not not necessarily bad if it is manageable (typically in the gut). If you go zero carb for a long time the pathogens will look for glucose wherever they can find it and therefore looking to migrate to somewhere where they are not controllable.

  13. Hi Ahrand,

    Pathogens like to spread regardless, if you give them glucose in the gut they’ll still try to spread to the brain.

    The issue is rather integrity of the gut barrier and immune function. Since glucose is needed for the mucosal barrier, for cell junctions and gut barrier integrity, and for immune function, zero-carbing makes it much easier for pathogens to reach the brain. If the zero-carb diet is zero plant food, it also diminishes the probiotic flora who can help protect against pathogens.

    So I do think zero-carbing raises risk of brain infections, but not because it makes gut pathogens hungry.

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