Recipes

Looking for recipes? On this page we have resources to help you find great recipes:

Our Food Posts

You can also find pictures with links to our recipes at our Pinterest board.

PHD-Compatible Food Bloggers

Some great food bloggers post PHD-compatible recipes. Our favorites include:

Also, those who follow my personal Facebook page know that Sarah Atshan frequently tags me with pictures of the very lovely PHD food that helped her lose 120 pounds. Visit Sarah’s Facebook page to check out her food.

 

Leave a comment ?

515 Comments.

  1. Food is Medicine: Foods for Vitality | samsuska - pingback on July 23, 2013 at 10:02 pm
  2. Adeneye Abdul-lateef

    Nice

  3. I’ve thought I hated liver since I was 7 years old. Traumatic experience. But last night, celebrating a friend’s birthday, I got a little wild…

    Just tasted Chicken Liver Pate for the first time at a restaurant called the Lockeland Table in East Nashville, Tenn. It was beautiful. In the 44 years since my mother tricked me into tasting beef liver, I’d been chicken to try chicken liver. But! Chicken liver isn’t like beef liver!!!!

    Lockeland Table’s chicken liver pate is made in tiny jelly jars.

    So I googled for a recipe, and can recommend the Chicken Liver Pate recipe at a site called davidlebovitz.com.

  4. Thank you for your book, PHD. I’ve been paleo/primal for about three years and improved several health problems, but haven’t experienced weight loss – no gain, but no loss either. Adding back rice and potatoes has been a wonderful boon without any weight gain or return of allergies, migraines, IBS, etc. – in fact, I’m slowly sliding down the scale as each week goes by – which is fine. I’d rather adopt a plan I can live with permanently than try to “diet.”

    Since we’re a rice and sweet potato growing region (south Louisiana), it’s been a joy to have my favorite starches again. I’m beginning to think that while paleo and primal are a great start, they have limitations. I’ve been wary of adding too much rice or potatoes to my day … I don’t eat before 1-2 p.m. except for coffee with raw cream and tend to limit rice or potatoes to the evening meal. But I’m still working out my own tolerances, and it sure has been fun! My husband certainly appreciates it as well. As a Cajun he can look at a rice field and tell you how much gravy it needs. :) (Side note: I make my roux with rice flour and coconut oil … he loves it!!)

    Adding liver is challenging for many people, and I thought you might enjoy a delicious way to incorporate it.

    Here in Acadiana, we call it rice dressing, but other regions call it dirty rice. Rice dressing sounds comforting and homey to me, dirty rice, not so much. I don’t measure or use a recipe, it’s more about feel and what you’re in the mood for when you make it.

    Start with the Cajun trinity (chopped onion, celery and bell peppers – I actually use poblanos because I prefer the flavor, and their little bit of heat) plus garlic. I make coconut oil/butter ghee and saute the veg in it. If you cut up the liver (I try for about 1/3 of the total meats) and saute it with the veg and then pulse it in a food processor, the texture is fine and is “lost” with the other ground meats. Sometimes I use ground beef and some ground pork, but the combination is cook’s choice – ground lamb or turkey are good, too.

    Brown the ground meats and add back the liver mixture. Season with salt, pepper – black and red – and whatever other herbs or spices you like. I make Cajun/Creole seasoning, too – salt, black and red pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, ground bay leaves and some “hidden” antioxidants and power seasonings: sumac, ground nigella seeds, turmeric and green tea. I use it on everything from fish to meat to vegetables.

    At this point I cool the mixture and separate it into smaller portions and freeze them. When you want to serve the rice dressing, defrost the meat, put some leftover or freshly prepared rice in a pot, add the meat mixture, saute until heated through and garnish with minced parsley and green onions. We like a 50/50 ratio of rice to meat, but again, that’s up to you. Enjoy!!

  5. Hi Paul, Love your book. Nice to see cookbooks on the way. One thing I would love to see is just a meal plan for 10-14 days or so, showing say what exactly one should eat around the 1600 calorie range say. Perhaps you can give us a sample meal plan for your retreat. That would really help. Keep up the great work!

  6. Despite whatever reducing your weight that you are towards
    erysipelas, positions, complexion, pimples, contact us the entire group what you will really, these are pestering and also shaming types give you in just give up looking.
    Even more so if they are more girl that do everybody is able to envision, similar to during your be up against.

  7. Bone Broth variation:
    Roast meaty and marrow bones one hour. Scoop out marrow and keep in a covered glass dish in the refrigerator. Or, maybe freeze in ice cube tray. Add roasted bones and other non-roasted bones (including a good sized halved beef foot) to stock pot and pour half cup vinegar over all. Let sit for 30 minutes then add water (whatever your pot holds –mine is a 6 qt). Recently got that enameled cast iron from Costco. By the way, take the lid off before lifting that pot, as it is much lighter. Roast in oven or on stove top, low heat for three hours. Take out meat and fat and refrigerate for use in a meal. Continue simmering stock for desired length. I don’t use Paul and Shou-Ching’s method because it just doesn’t turn out the same. I try to let this first batch simmer for about 12 hours, then add more water and simmer that one another 12 hours. I make subsequent batches but never keep any fat that remains, as it seems to bother my joints.

    Here’s the good part. Heat up a serving of the chilled gelatinous broth and pour it into your liquifying blender. Add a couple tablespoons (or more) of the refrigerated or frozen bone marrow and blend on high until completely liquified. Pour into good-sized mug, add Real Salt. Curl up in a fave chair and sip your truly delicious winter drink. YUM.

  8. Ooops, forgot to suggest adding coarsely chopped onions, garlic, and bay leaves a few hours before simmering time ends.

  9. Just as much as modern-day weight loss plans have a tendency to really encourage
    either periodic days of going on a fast, or perhaps limiting calorific diet plan, the Paleo diet is
    usually close to adequate in order to getting the complete opposing.
    Have been many of us lucky enough to be able to go over and also examine our own life styles together with people each of our ancestors
    and forefathers, the easy truth that individuals might understand could be that will your meals are right now there to get taken instructions as far as possible : when obtainable.
    In a world with no refrigeration (or ease stores) the fact is that when some sort of fodder or maybe pick was generated within typically the group, it could be devoured while swiftly as is possible prior to
    foodstuff started to give up on along with pamper.

  10. I love wraps, but they are made of wheat and sometimes corn. I tried the rice paper, but it did not work for me. Does anyone know a PHD alternative to wheat or corn tortillas for wraps?

  11. Hi
    I bought the book on amazon, because I have Hashimoto´s disease and this book really help me. I have a question, what kind of cheese do you recommend to buy? Regards

  12. Hi Paul and Shou-ching,

    Thanks for all of your amazing research and work. It really brings together everything I’ve read about health. I went off proton-pump inhibitors cold turkey and my stomach feels fine. I am eternally grateful.

    I do have a few questions – not sure if this is the place to post them.
    When you say you simply boil potatoes, do you dice them first? Skin them? Does the level of the flame matter – i.e. barley simmering or full on boil? I’m a cooking newb and specifics on these basic recipes would help a ton!

    Do you weight out your food when you purchase it? Are the weights given for food before it is cooked?

    Thanks again!

  13. Just want to share that I happened on a website that suggested adding grated vegetables to meatballs to make them moist. I am off a couple of the suggested vegetables — celery, carrots — because of allergies. But zucchini is safe for me, so I added a whole zucchini to two pounds of pastured ground beef, along with herbs, spices, egg, and prepared them as Paul and SC suggest using boiling ginger water. I froze the batch and have been taking a quarter pound of them for lunch at work. Add to them broccoli and rice. I heat the mixture in a small $50 convection oven (Costco), then add my fermented cilantro salsa, and eat up an amazingly delicious lunch. My meatballs are nearly dripping they are so moist. Don’t know if the convection oven makes a difference, but everything seems to taste better. Could be the moist meatballs. Doesn’t matter. Lunch is a highlight in my busy day.

    • Lana,

      Could you please give specifics for making your cilantro salsa?

      We have some Cilantro the greenhouse and it is not going to last. A fermented salsa recipe is just what I need!

      • Lana, just googled cilantro salsa and there were plenty of recipes. but they all called for tomatoes, which I don’t like to buy this time of year. So unless your recipe is tomato free, never mind my request..

  14. How do I sign up to receive your blog?

  15. Seaweed Chebe Bread
    This simple basic “bread”–a pancake, really, came from Ellen Ussery, my country cousin in Virginia. When my daughter had her wisdom tooth out, I wanted her to have something soft, easy to chew, nutritious and tasty to go with her butternut squash soup so I added chopped garlic, sautéed red pepper and seaweed to Ellen’s basic batter batter.
    1 cup tapioca flour
    1 tsp baking powder
    3 eggs beaten
    2 tbsp melted butter, ghee or coconut oil
    1 cup chopped seaweed, soaked in water until soft
    3 cloves chopped garlic briefly browned in olive oil
    1 chopped sweet red pepper browned in olive oil
    MIX IT ALTOGETHER and fry in small batches on a greased griddle, flipping once. This cooks FAST!
    Best eaten hot and is easily warmed up in a toaster oven, perhaps with some melted cheese on top. Great with yogurt or sour cream, too.

    • Update on Seaweed Chebe Bread
      Just like all PHD recipes, this one continues to evolve and change with each iteration. This time I roasted three heads of garlic in the oven in olive oil and squeezed that into the batter. Also added sautéed shiitake mushrooms and sautéed chopped green onions as well as the red pepper and seaweed. This is getting more and more like Okonomyaki without the Japanese mountain yams and proteins (seafood, bacon). This time we ate the pancakes as a side, topped with Greek yogurt, with a brisket of beef entree. Fabulous.

      • Oooooh roasted garlic. Yum! And a good way to use up all that garlic from our garden that is stored in the guest room closet!

        I may try an all allium version. Roasted garlic and some onions cooked slow and long and then some onions and garlic cooked very briefly. The long cooked onions have lots of flavor the briefly cooked ones are more beneficial to gut flora. And for the briefly cooked garlic, chop it fine and let it sit ten minutes before cooking to create the beneficial allicin. The long cooked onions are something I make on days whenI am in the kitchen doing other things, then freeze in batches.

  16. I just noticed Paul tweeted about a PHD compliant mayo that someone is trying to get going on kickstarter. I hope this project is successful.
    In the meantime, does anyone have a recipe for a decent tasting mayo?
    I haven’t liked any that I’ve made

    • I’ve posted mine here recently. I’ll try to find out which thread it’s in. It combines pure olive oil (milder tasting) and melted coconut oil, lemon juice, whole eggs, honey, dried mustard, and salt. The flavor is nice. Consistency is less creamy than storebought, but it works.

      • MAYONNAISE
        from Marilyn at BTVC

        2 large eggs, room temp
        2 T fresh lemon juice
        1/2 tsp honey
        1/2 tsp dried mustard
        3/4 tsp salt
        1/2 tsp white pepper
        1 1/4 c mild tasting oil (such as pure olive oil)
        3/4 c melted coconut oil

        Beat eggs, lemon, honey, salt, pepper, and mustard until quite frothy. (Or process in a food processor.) While continuing to whisk (or with food processor going), begin to slowly add oil, in a very thin stream. It should take at least one minute to pour the oil. Continue whisking or food-processing until quite thick. Store in a glass jar in the back of the refrigerator and use by date on the egg carton (or, with farm eggs, about 3 weeks).

        • Thanks so much! I’ll try this tomorrow hopefully. Maybe the addition of the coconut oil will improve the taste

          I tried searching for a recipe on the blog but I don’t know how to get to the individual result from the hits you get from the search bar. Some of the comments are in the hundreds! A good testament to this blog but makes it nearly impossible to go through :shock:

          Thanks again

  17. Just made Marilyn’s mayonnaise. Nice accompaniment to gilled salmon with rice and green beans. Thanks!

  18. Hello. Just bought your book on my Kindle. Really have learned a lot. I am a diabetic and have gained a lot of weight. I am new to this type of diet but am trying to learn. As a new participant, what is the easiest way to start? I am staying away from your “do not eat” items and trying to stick to your suggested foods. But, it is hard, so much to change from a lifetime of eating wrong.

  19. Bacon Gravy

    I use this gravy to thin out pureed scrambled eggs for my mom because she has Parkinson’s disease and can’t chew or swallow well.

    2 Tablespoons bacon grease
    1 piece bacon crumbled/crushed
    1 1/2 Tablespoon PHD approved flour (potato flour/tapioca/rice flour mixture)
    1/3 cup heavy cream
    2/3 cup water
    S&P to taste

    Melt the grease in a pan with the flour mixture. Let the flour sizzle for about a minute to take away the the floury taste. Add the bacon crumbs. I puree them in the food processor to make them really fine for my mom. Then add the cream and water. Stir constantly until you reach the desired consistency! It gets ready real quick. Add the salt and pepper at the last. If it’s too thick, just add water. If it’s too thin, just cook it a bit longer to reduce the volume. This recipe doesn’t really keep well, so I make it fresh when I want it.

  20. I like to use a pressure cooker. Does pressure cooked food work in the PHD?

  21. I love your website and it’s a great read.

  22. Have been looking for this type info for quite a while. Am going to give it a shot.Hubby & I both hypothyroid and hubby is also diabetic.

  23. I am trying to find recipes for ground beef and ground liver that you mention in you PHD book on your website. Could you help me find them plz?

    Regards,
    Beth

  24. PHD littlenecks and rice pasta recipe.
    24 little necks
    1 package rice pasta
    1 cup organic white wine
    1/2 organic olive oil
    juice of 1 lemon
    4 garlic cloves minced
    3 tablespoons grass fed butter
    1 tablespoon sea salt
    1 tablespoon basil
    1 teaspoon black pepper

    Place wine, olive oil, butter, juice of 1 lemon, and spices in stock pot. Boil on medium heat. Place littlenecks in and cover and steam 5 minutes or until they are all opened. Boil rice pasta, drain, and cover with littlenecks and sauce.
    primalpsychologist.com

  25. These coconut wraps are great! they have a plain and a curry and my husband and I like them both.

  26. Paul,

    What fruits do you recommend ?
    It is ok to mix fruits with protein and carbohydrates and fats, and protein with carbohydrates?Or better to separate and eat fruits alone? I think about easier meals for digestion.

    Thanks

  27. What about arrowroot?

  28. Please, please publish a cookbook with all your recipes. I only have access to a computer occasionally and would love to have your recipe book in my kitchen. Thanks!

  29. CHOCOLATE STICKY RICE PUDDING

    I’ve started making this and it’s very simple. I don’t have laser precise measurements, but it’s so easy you can do each ingredient to taste and I’ll give you the basic idea:

    - 3 cups (before cooking) Sticky rice (sold as “sweet rice”)
    - 10 0z. 100 pure cacao chocolate bar
    - 1 tablespoon Vanilla extract
    - 3 tablespoons Butter
    - 4 oz. Cream
    - 6 Egg yolks
    - Safe sweetener to taste (I use a combination of dextrose powder and tapioca syrup. I just used about 28 oz. of tapioca syrup and 4 oz. dextrose)
    - salt to taste (salt brings out the flavor of the chocolate quite a bit)

    Cook your sticky rice, yielding about 6-7 cups of cooked rice. Transfer to a sauce pan. Add butter, cream, Chocolate and stir until incorporated. Mix over low heat, occasionally removing the pan from the heat to prevent burning the rice on the bottom. Begin adding sweetener and salt until you’re just shy of the sweetness you like. I like it pretty sweet with a salty ting. Once you’re close to the taste you like add the egg yolks. To temper them I lay them on top of the warm rice and stir them just into the top layer of rice to warm them up. Once they’re tempered, stir them into the rest of the pudding. You can use even more egg yolks if you want a more custardy flavor and to add more nutrition. I think I could have put in 12 total egg yolks and it wouldn’t taste drastically different. Once you’ve fine tuned the sweet/salt you’re done!

    This satisfies my desire for dark, bittersweet chocolate flavors, while being quite substantial, and the texture of sticky rice is great with dessert.

    The best part about this is now that you have a TON of rice pudding, it freezes amazingly well. Scoop some into individual freezer bags and take them out whenever you want. They defrost naturally very quickly. Or heat them up. Whatever works.

    All hail Chocolate our dark lord and supreme master :twisted:

    • FYI the vanilla extract I use is home made and might not be as strong as store bought, so start with a teaspoon and see where you’re at.

  30. 1. Do you consider Flax and Chia seeds healthy or unhealthy?
    2. There is a photo of what looks like ice cream w/ strawberries on the back cover of your book. I’m puzzled. I have yet to find a mention of eating ice cream in the text. Is sugar OK in thing such as ice cream because of the high fat content? . . . and . . . what about such things as Stevia?
    3. I’m 77 and although my blood sugar is a bit elevated (as is my cholesterol), I take no medications, have no known medical problems. I’ve been eating whole grain wheat, corn, and rice daily for over 50 years. Granted . . . I make it all at home and my wheat breads get long fermentations. Other than being about 20 pounds overweight (mostly in my belly) I’m aware of no other wheat/grain-related complications. In fact . . . I’ve tried low carb diets but have felt so bad on them that within a couple of days I’ve returned to whole grains for relief. I’ve been on PHD for a few days and must say that the addition of white rice and potatoes have made it a comfortable exercise. But . . . if Grains are so bad why I am so healthy??
    4. compassion for animals makes me want to eat at least as a vegetarian. Do you think that long-fermented sourdough bread (white) and things like Tempeh and sprouted grain breads are at all “safe”? In other words . . . is there a “vegetarian version” of the PHD?
    Thanks . . . . David

Leave a Comment


NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks: